Something Else To Be Concerned About During Menstruation:  Is There A Connection Between COVID-19 Vaccines And Irregular Periods?

Something Else To Be Concerned About During Menstruation: Is There A Connection Between COVID-19 Vaccines And Irregular Periods?

Taking over-the counter medication (i.e., Pamprin, Midol, Aspirin) to reduce cramps and fluid retention. Having at-the-ready feminine hygiene products for home, work, and daily outings. Making sure no DNA gets on clothing articles. Using other products to remain fresh to be near.

These are some of the aspects females deal with on a regular basis during menstruation with healthy periods, not abnormal ones.

Now, there is another concern that may increase anxiety. Craven (2021) talks about whether the COVID vaccines are causing side effects in menstrual cycles. You can read more at, Why We Don’t Know What’s Actually Going on With Periods and COVID Vaccines (msn.com)

Vikki

Reference

Craven, J. (2021). Why We Don’t Know What’s Actually Going On With Periods And COVID Vaccines. Retrieved From Why We Don’t Know What’s Actually Going on With Periods and COVID Vaccines (msn.com)

The Anxiety Series, Part III, Cognitive Dissonance

A person with two competing thoughts that cause psychological distress is an informal definition of cognitive dissonance.

The more formal definition, per Sarkis (2017) is:  “Cognitive dissonance is the feeling that something is not sitting right with you”, and “…having contradictory beliefs.”

Cognitive Dissonance. When You Are Confronted With Opposing Information, Your Brain Resists (Sarkis, 2017) has advice in combating that emotional discomfort that can create anxiety.

 

Vikki

Reference

Sarkis, S. A., Ph.D. (2017).  Cognitive Dissonance.  When You Are Confronted With Opposing Information, Your Brain Resists.  Retrieved From https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/here-there-and-everywhere/201709/cognitive-dissonance

 

Borderline Personality Disorder

Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) have wild mood swings, short-term intense depression and anxiety, engage in risky behaviors (i.e., sexual practices, driving habits, gambling, illegal drug use), and self-injury.  They do not have a sense of themselves, and have a fear of being alone.  The individual with BPD has relationship difficulties because they antagonize people they once held in high regard.  Because they view issues as either positive or negative, they cannot find the middle ground where appropriate.  They exhibit anger management problems and can become violent.

Causes of BPD:

  • Abandonment in childhood (genuine or imagined)
  • Brain Abnormalities (i.e., emotion regulation, aggression)
  • Chemical Imbalance (i.e., serotonin)
  • Child Abuse
  • Genetics

Additional problems resulting from BPD:

  • Alcoholism
  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Confrontations with Law Enforcement
  • Eating Disorders
  • Excessive Debt
  • Illegal Substance Abuse Addiction
  • Sexually-Transmitted Diseases
  • Unexpected Pregnancies

Psychotherapy and drug therapy* are treatments for BPD.

*When absolutely necessary.

Vikki