The Latest Mental Health News

P. Verbanas:  Antipsychotics For Depression May Come With A Higher Death Risk

 

 

C. Fleiss:  PTSD Common Among Health Workers Even After A Year Of Pandemic: Study

 

 

R. Berman, Fact checked by J. Beake, Ph.D.:  How Dissociation Occurs In The Brain

 

 

C. Offord:  Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Depression Symptoms: Study

 

 

Z. Abrams:  Treating Bipolar Disorder In Kids And Teens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vikki

 

 

 

 

The Anxiety Series, Part IV, Conclusion, That Self-Inflicted Disorder, Perfectionism

 

Reasonable, Healthy Thinking:

– A person has an everyday goal of having one’s attire pulled together, looking presentable;

– Wanting to live in a safer, cleaner neighborhood;

– Eye-balling job tasks more than a few instances before turning in completed assignment to the boss when proficiencies are of import, and

– Parents sending their children to better schools so that offspring can have a quality educational experience.

 

Unreasonable, Unhealthy Thinking:

– Anyone who is anybody wears these designer clothes;

– Wanting to live at a certain zip code where “important” people reside;

– Failing to turn in job assignment to the boss within the deadline because worker is proofing to the extreme, and

– Parents demanding offspring receive all A’s on report cards.

 

These are foolish and damaging thought patterns and behaviors, which will result with somebody experiencing a mental health disorder.

Tabaka (2017) has a narrative about how perfection can wreck an individual’s mental health, and how dissimilar these traits are in comparison to high-achieving people in, 8 Signs You’re A Perfectionist (And Why It’s Toxic To Your Mental Health).

 

Vikki

Reference

Tabaka, M. (2017).  8 Signs You’re A Perfectionist (And Why It’s Toxic To Your Mental Health).  Retrieved From https://www.inc.com/marla-tabaka/8-signs-youre-a-perfectionist-and-why-its-toxic-to-your-mental-health.html

 

The Anxiety Series, Part III, Cognitive Dissonance

A person with two competing thoughts that cause psychological distress is an informal definition of cognitive dissonance.

The more formal definition, per Sarkis (2017) is:  “Cognitive dissonance is the feeling that something is not sitting right with you”, and “…having contradictory beliefs.”

Cognitive Dissonance. When You Are Confronted With Opposing Information, Your Brain Resists (Sarkis, 2017) has advice in combating that emotional discomfort that can create anxiety.

 

Vikki

Reference

Sarkis, S. A., Ph.D. (2017).  Cognitive Dissonance.  When You Are Confronted With Opposing Information, Your Brain Resists.  Retrieved From https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/here-there-and-everywhere/201709/cognitive-dissonance