WARNING: Graphic Content

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) And Brain Injuries

[National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-SAFE(7233)]

INTRODUCTION

Our immediate thoughts are on the military and football players when brain injury is the topic of discussion. These injuries can become life changing for the patient, and heart wrenching for loved ones who see an unfavorable difference in personality and disposition.

Those who suffer from Intimate Partner Violence (usually women), are individuals who also deserve recognition for brain injuries because they, too, experience debilitating cognitive issues. Many from this community lack awareness that they even have brain injuries, and could have experienced several over the duration of the abusive relationship from their partner.

THE KEY ASPECT THAT PLAYED A ROLE IN IPV

Domestic violence increased tremendously because of the COVID-19 Pandemic lockdowns (Ballard, 2022) and (George, Wesley, & Geraghty, 2021).

“There are households where the pandemic has become a reason why family members finally interact with each other. In some cases, this helps to enhance the quality of relationships within a family. However, in families where there are abusive patterns, the home confinement and social isolation can be very dangerous to the victims” (George, Wesley, & Geraghty, 2021).

AN IMPORTANT FINDING

Ballard (2022) mentions a conference that was held earlier this year: Seeking Tomorrow’s Answers Together [STAT]. One of the topics was how COVID-19 affected mental health.

Lockdowns were detrimental for people in abusive relationships!

These are people who were literally held hostage by their abusers because the abusers had unlimited access to their victims.

Thus, lockdowns created a more dangerous existence for people who may have been already living with IPV.

CONCLUSION

Intimate partners, the medical community, safety forces, the various legal institutions, and society in general, all need to recognize that brain injuries due to the IPV epidemic is prevalent. Then, they can become aware of behaviors [symptomology] that are associated with those subjected to IPV (Costello & Greenwald, 2022), (Hillstrom, 2022), (Sutherland & Chakrabarti, 2022), and (Valera, 2022).

This knowledge can help remove misconceptions about these individuals, especially when they are confronted with life-and-death situations independent of their abusers.

Vikki

References

Ballard, J. (2022). From Pandemic To Endemic: Relationship Violence Due To COVID. Retrieved From https://www.du.edu/news/pandemic-endemic-relationship-violence-due-covid

Costello, K., & Greenwald, B. D. (2022). Update On Domestic Violence And Traumatic Brain Injury: A Narrative Review. Retrieved From https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35053865/

George, E. S., Wesley, M. S., & Geraghty, L. (Eds.). (2021). Cultural Studies. Marital Stress And Domestic Violence During The COVID-19 Pandemic. Retrieved From https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/23311983.2021.1992085

Hillstrom, C. (2022). The Hidden Epidemic Of Brain Injuries From Domestic Violence. Retrieved From https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/01/magazine/brain-trauma-domestic-violence.html

National Domestic Violence Hotline. (2022). Here For You. Retrieved From https://www.thehotline.org/

Sutherland, P., & Chakrabarti, M. (2022). An ‘Invisible Epidemic’: Survivors Of Domestic Violence On Living With Traumatic Brain Injury. Retrieved From https://www.wbur.org/onpoint/2022/01/20/survivors-of-domestic-violence-on-living-with-traumatic-brain-injury

Valera, E., PhD. (2022). Women’s Health. Intimate Partner Violence And Traumatic Brain Injury: An Invisible Public Health Epidemic. Retrieved From https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/intimate-partner-violence-and-traumatic-brain-injury-an-invisible-public-health-epidemic-201812132708#:~:text=Intimate%20partner%20violence%20and%20traumatic%20brain%20injury%3A%20An%20invisible%20public%20health%20epidemic,-March%2017%2C%202022&text=While%20studying%20brain%20injuries%20in,consistent%20with%20possibly%20experiencing%20concussions.

Repairing A Broken Mental Health System

Suggestions are:

1. The American Psychological Association performs tremendous work.  And when members think out of the box in bringing positive mental health results for the patient, those ideas deserve emulating.  However, there’s always room for improvement (i.e., ceasing to engage in illogical arguments/practices/agendas).

  • Going before the US Supreme Court and stating that underage females are responsible enough in obtaining abortions without parental consent.  If this argument was truly valid, underage females wouldn’t require abortions because they would have prevented the pregnancies from occurring.
  • A female* may experience psychological difficulties after her first abortion when she has a history of mental health problems.  Actually, a female may experience psychological difficulties after an initial abortion because of hormonal changes, even if she doesn’t have prior mental health issues.  Any prior mental health difficulties are exacerbated after having that first abortion.
  • Removing PTSD in the DSM-5 as an anxiety disorder and stating that the condition is merely associated with anxiety.  After further consideration on the subject, I can’t help but ask What were they thinking?

2. Pursuing corporate investors for funding.

3. Increase of neighborhood mental health clinics.

4. Additional group homes for patients as they make the transition from a psychiatric hospital stay before returning to their permanent residence.

5. Aggressive marketing for Public Service Announcements (PSA’s) throughout the various media platforms to de-stigmatize mental health.

6. Hiring additional social workers to deepen ties with the psychological community, and as safety nets for patients from falling through cracks within the bureaucracy.

7. Psychological outreach for routine workshops in K-12, houses of worship, and universities, providing literature with local resources available.

*Women and underage females alike.

Vikki

Harmful Effects of Noise Pollution

Noise pollution (aka sound pollution) is defined as harmful environmental noises (i.e., construction equipment, lawn mowers, living near industrial areas, airports, freeways, railway systems etc.).

The following are consequences from noise pollution:

Children (more vulnerable because of developing organs)

  • Ignoring teachers in classroom because they’re conditioned to ignore sounds
  • Hearing Loss
  • Stunted reading and language skills
  • Elevated stress levels
  • Elevated blood pressure levels

Women

  • Abnormal menstruation cycles
  • Abnormal embryos
  • Miscarriages
  • Premature births

Men and Women

  • Psychological difficulties
  • Heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Blurred vision
  • Tinnitus
  • Hearing loss
  • Sleeplessness

Vikki